The More the Merrier by David Martin

Reviewed by Diane Basting (Library Staff)

Bear starts a dance party that lets all the animals show off their dance moves and even if you don’t move like your friends it doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the same beat! Fun story with simple pictures and light rhyming, a great read aloud on a rainy day to get your little one to dance like a bear, wiggle like a snake, or stomp like a moose.

Located in Children’s Picture Books (E MARTIN)

Animal Crossing: Deserted Island Diary by Kokonasu Rumba

Reviewed by Jess H (Library Staff)

You won’t need to have played Animal Crossing New Horizons to enjoy Deserted Island Diary. These quick, quirky stories perfectly encapsulate the hijinks of playing games with friends and encountering goofy characters.

As an Animal Crossing fan, most of the humor in this book lands. The art is pretty adorable too. If you like cute, quick, funny stories, Deserted Island Diary is a good one to pick up.

Located in Children’s Manga (J MANGA ANIMAL #1)


What’s in Your Pockets? by Heather Montgomery

Reviewed by Diane Basting (Library Staff)

What’s in your Pocket is a collection of snap shots of different scientists when they were just children collecting things that interested them and reminds us that what children collect can grow into a life long love of science and change how we think about peanuts, caterpillars, bones, snails, or even life above the tree tops. I think everyone needs this reminder that curious kids lead to amazing discoveries and we all need to empty our pockets before we do laundry!

Located in Children’s Nonfiction (J 508.092 MON)

Saucy by Cynthia Kadohata

Reviewed by Andrea Bisordi (Library Staff)

Becca would like to be very good at something, but she just can’t seem to find the thing for her. Then a piglet enters her life, and she is sure that saving this little piglet will be the thing for her! The problem is, the pig, whom she names Saucy, is just not cut out to be a house pet. How can she be good at something she might have to give up?

Fans of Mercy Watson who are looking for a longer tale would enjoy this one very much. Saucy gets into all kinds of mischief while still being beloved by the family. I also liked how Becca is trying to understand her place in her family, her school, and life in general. A delightful story.

Located in Children’s Fiction (J FIC KADOHATA)

In a Jar by Deborah Marcero

Reviewed by Diane Basting (Library Staff)

Most people can collect memories with cameras and reminders in jars like stones from a hike or a photo of a sunset but Lewellyn has a special way of collecting memories in jars and shares them with his friend Evelyn. Find out what Llewellyn and Evelyn collect and what memories they share both near and far.

Located in Children’s Picture Books (E MARCERO)

Daughter of the Deep by Rick Riordan

Reviewed by Andrea Bisordi (Library Staff)

Ana Dakkar thinks that she’s about to endure the equivalent of finals at her small private school named Harding-Pencroft, but things don’t turn out the way she or anyone else expects them to. Now she must take charge of the expedition and lean into her heritage in ways she doesn’t expect. A solid cohort of friends and enemies draws you into this nautical adventure.

I have enjoyed the pacing of Rick Riordan’s other novels, and while this one is slightly more sedate, the new discoveries and plot twists kept me engaged. I am also a big fan of his humor – I mean, everybody puts their enemies in pink ducky water wings, right? If you like adventure, fun characters, and dolphins named Socrates, this is the book for you.

Located in Children’s Fiction (J FIC RIORDAN)

Mina by Matthew Forsythe

Reviewed by Melissa Beck (Library Staff)

It has been a while since I’ve discovered a picture book so hilarious and heartwarming that I am compelled to read it aloud, unsolicited, to all of my friends, family, and co-workers. Well, I’ve been carrying Mina around for the past week, reading it out loud to everyone, and laughing every single time.

Mina tells the story of the titular bookish mouse who is extremely content with her cozy life until her father brings home a surprise that changes everything. Despite the simplified shapes of the characters, Matthew Forsythe is a master at conveying thoughts and feelings in each facial expression.

As a fan of his previous picture book, Pokko and the Drum, I had an idea of the lush, earthy art style and zany story I was probably getting into, but I did not know that the pacing would be so perfect, the page-turns so dramatic, and the characters quite so brave and loveable.

I brought my copy back today for you to check out but, now that I think of it, I haven’t had a chance to read it to the mailman yet…

Available through the Bridges Library System

Looking for a Moose by Phyllis Root

Reviewed by Diane Basting (Library Staff)


Moose are very hard to find, in fact our four explorers have never seen one! The only solution they can come up with is to go in search of the Elusive moose on their nature hike. Every other page spread or so has a moose; some are easy to spot via their antlers or tails, some are harder to find with only their hooves showing. Will you and our hikers be able to spot all the moose along the way? Find out in this delightful hide and seek without flaps picture book.

Located in Children’s Picture Books (E ROOT)

How to Find What You’re Not Looking For by Veera Hiranandani

Reviewed by Andrea Bisordi (Library Staff)

Ariel and her sister Leah are very close, even though Leah is six years older. So, when Leah starts spending a lot of time with Raj, eleven-year-old Ariel isn’t sure what it will mean for their relationship, even though Raj seems nice and even takes her out for ice cream. But then, the girls’ Jewish parents reject Raj, and eloping seems like Leah’s only option. Ariel’s world is turned upside down, and everything seems harder without Leah, including managing her dysgraphia and working at the family bakery. How can she help the family come together again?

This historical fiction story is quite interesting. Like Ms. Hiranandani’s Newbery Honor winning title The Night Diary, this book talks a lot about how the main character is feeling. I loved the setting, in part because it takes place the same year my parents got married. 54 years seems like a long time, but it was a great reminder that the Supreme court case Loving vs. Virginia was decided only a couple of generations ago. I believe it makes court cases much more interesting when you consider the impact they had on people’s day to day lives. Kids who like historical fiction, deep characters, or books about feelings would probably enjoy this book.

Located in Children’s Fiction (J FIC HIRANANDANI)

While I Was Away by Waka T. Brown

Reviewed by Andrea Bisordi (Library Staff)

Waka lives in Kansas with her Japanese born parents, and they speak both Japanese and English at home. Concerned that Waka’s Japanese is not strong enough, her parents decide to send her to Japan for four months to live with her grandmother and attend Japanese school. Waka has always been a strong student, so struggling with reading is very frustrating to her, and getting along with her grandmother proves tricky as well.

I have always loved Japanese culture, so I really enjoyed this inside look at a Japanese school in the 1980s. Japanese words are sprinkled liberally throughout the text, as well as explanations for how some of the kanji are derived. I enjoyed Waka’s journey, her honesty, and her recollections of what this time in her life were like. If you like true stories (this is a memoir), like learning new things, and enjoy reading about relationships, this might be the book for you.

Located in Children’s Fiction (J FIC BROWN)

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