Spotlight On: Adult Nonfiction

Nonfiction (Adult): These are books that are based on facts, real people, or real events. They are shelved based on the Dewey Decimal System, which assigns a number to the book based on the subject of the book. Our nonfiction section for Adults is located on the left hand side, once you’ve made it to our central circulation desk.

The Know-It All: One Man’s Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World / A.J. Jacobs

A hilarious, intelligent-trivia-packed story from a man who read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica. Early in his career, A.J. Jacobs found himself putting his Ivy League education to work at Entertainment weekly. After five years he learned which stars have fake boobs, which stars have toupees, which have both, and not much else. This unsettling realization led Jacobs on a life-changing quest: to read the entire contents of the Encyclopedia Britannica, all 33,000 pages, all 44 million words. (031 JAC)

Thinking, Fast and Slow / Daniel Kahneman

A psychologist draws on years of research to introduce his “machinery of the mind” model on human decision making to reveal the faults and capabilities of intuitive versus logical thinking. (153.42 KAH)

 

Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace / Anne Lamott

amott has once again written a brilliant and insightful book that offers a message of hope that celebrates the triumph of light over the darkness in our lives. Our victories over hardships and pain may be small, they may be infrequent, but they keep us going and they often come from the most unexpected places: within ourselves. (248 LAM)

The Girls of Murder City: fame, Lust, and the Beautiful Killers Who Inspired Chicago / Douglas Perry

Documents the true stories of Belva Gaertner and Beulah Annan, the women whose sensational murder trials inspired the musical “Chicago,” and traces the contributions of fledgling reporter Maurine Watkins against a backdrop of Chicago’s Jazz Age culture. (364.1523 PER)

It’s Greek to Me!: Brush Up Your Classics / Michael Macrone

Here is a fabulous and fun reference guide to the Latin and Greek origins of such words and expressions as “windbag” and “seize the day,” as well as a lively tour through the literature and life of ancient times. (422.481 MAC)

 

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History / Elizabeth Kolberg

Draws on the work of geologists, botanists, marine biologists, and other researchers to discuss the five devastating mass extinctions on Earth and predicts the coming of a sixth. (576.8 KOL)

 

The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook / Deb Perelman

The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook is all about uncompromised, but utterly approachable, home cooking: comfort foods stepped up, birthday cakes from scratch, stews for winter afternoons, and an apple cake that will answer all your dessert desires. (641.5 PER)

 

1001 Paintings You Must See Before You Die / Stephen Farthing

From Ancient Egyptian frescoes to the Renaissance masters, from French Impressionists to American Abstract Expressionists, this highly browsable guide embraces all cultures and every style of painting from 4,000 BC to the present. (750.11 ONE)

 

Paris in Love / Eloisa James

Chronicles the year that the author and her family lived in Paris, describing her walking tours of the city, her school-age children’s attempts to navigate foreign language schools, and her thoughts on the pleasures and eccentricities of French living. (813.54 JAM)

 

In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin / Erik Larson

Documents the efforts of the first American ambassador to Hitler’s Germany, William E. Dodd, to acclimate to a residence in an increasingly violent city where he is forced to associate with the Nazis while his daughter pursues a relationship with Gestapo chief Rudolf Diels. (943.086 LAR)

 

“A library is a good place to go when you feel unhappy, for there, in a book, you may find encouragement and comfort. A library is a good place to go when you feel bewildered or undecided, for there, in a book, you may have your question answered. Books are good company, in sad times and happy times, for books are people-people who have managed to stay alive by hiding between the covers of a book.” ~E.B. White

 

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